Axon's Mission

Axon’s mission is to eradicate Alzheimer’s disease by developing tau-based treatments that halt the disease and relieve symptoms in sufferers, as well as prevent onset in potential victims.

7.6
Billion WORLD
POPULATION
674
Million WORLD
POPULATION OVER 65
35
Million
ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE CASES

Who we are

Axon Neuroscience is an industry-leading clinical stage biotech company at the forefront of treating and preventing Alzheimer’s disease.

Axon Neuroscience was founded in 1999 by Professor Michal Novák, who began his research in the late 1980s in the Laboratory of Molecular Biology, MRC in Cambridge with Nobel Laureates Sir Aaron Klug, Cesar Milstein and John Walker. Professor Novak had a crucial role in discovering tau protein as the structural constituent of neurofibrillary tangles, a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. He was the first to make the link between structural changes of tau and Alzheimer’s disease, proposing tau as a valid target for therapy. Professor Novak and Axon have since pioneered the clinical development of tau therapy. Our scientific team has over 20 years‘ experience in research of Alzheimer’s disease and is the single biggest team in the world dedicated exclusively to tau immunotherapeutics. Axon Neuroscience’s first-in-man tau vaccine AADvac1 has the potential to address one of the world’s most critical unmet medical needs, having a monumental impact on Alzheimer’s disease victims and their families. "Alzheimer’s disease has long been the silent plague of mankind. Despite meaningful efforts across the industry, an effective prevention and treatment has not yet been discovered. Axon is on a mission to change this. With over two decades of dedicated research, our expert team is leading industry on the path to finding a tau-based treatment. The very positive results from our landmark Phase II clinical trial underpin our confidence, and strengthen our motivation to get a treatment to patients as soon as possible."

Michal Fresser, CEO of Axon Neuroscience

Our Story

Axon Neuroscience‘s Story

Alzheimer’s disease dates back to 1906, when Alois Alzheimer described changes in the brain tissue of his patient Auguste Deter, who had died of a peculiar mental illness.

1988

In 1988, Professor Michal Novak, co-founder of Axon Neuroscience, who started his research in the late 1980s in the Laboratory of molecular biology, MRC, Cambridge with Nobel Laureates Sir Aaron Klug, Cesar Milstein and John Walker, discovered tau protein as the structural component of neurofibrillary tangles, a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.

1994

In 1994, Professor Novak proposed a hypothesis that pathological tau truncation – a cleavage process by which physiological (healthy) tau is modified and transformed into pathological (unhealthy) tau, is the key modification of tau protein in Alzheimer’s disease brain.

1999

In 1999, AXON Neuroscience was founded by Professor Novak in Vienna, Austria.

2001

In 2001, Axon scientists discovered and characterised a particular form of the truncated tau protein with a causal role in AD – “Alzheimer tau”.

2003

In 2003, Axon developed the first transgenic rat model reproducing a sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease, and thus validated Alzheimer tau as the major cause of Alzheimer’s disease neurodegeneration.

2009

Axon scientists identified two leading tau therapeutic candidates: AADvac1 – the active tau vaccine; and AADvac2 – a therapeutic monoclonal antibody that directly target pathological tau.

2013

The first Alzheimer’s disease patient was vaccinated with AADvac1 in a Phase 1 trial performed in Austria.

2019

Axon successfully finished the Phase II trial ADAMANT in patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease.

2020

Axon began developing a vaccine and therapeutic antibodies against COVID-19, demonstrating the versatility and applicability of Axon’s research and peptide vaccine platform to a novel disease area.




People

Axon Neuroscience has assembled an international team of leading experts in the field of neuroscience and clinical drug development to support the design, conduct, and analysis of Axon Neuroscience clinical trials for new treatments of Alzheimer’s disease and other related neurodegenerative disorders.

Michal Fresser
Chief Executive Officer
Norbert Žilka
Chief Science Officer
Ladislav Satko
Chief Financial Officer
Roman Sivák
Managing Director of Axon Neuroscience CRM and R&D
Prof. Michal Novák
Co-Founder of Axon Neuroscience
Bengt Winblad
MD, Prof., Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm, SE
Philip Scheltens
Dr, Prof., Director of VUmc Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam, NL
Howard Feldman
MD, FRCP(C), Director of UC San Diego ADCS, San Diego, USA
John Harrison
Assoc Prof., Alzheimer Center, VUmc, Amsterdam, NL/UK
Khalid Iqbal
Professor and Chairman, Department of Neurochemistry, Staten Island, New York, USA
Richard Kay
Expert in Statistics, University of Cardiff, UK
Reinhold Schmidt
Univ.-Prof. Dr.med.univ , Universitätsklinik für Neurologie, Graz, AT
Lutz Frölich
MD, Prof., Head of Clinics of Gerontopsychiatry, Mannheim, GE
Jakub Hort
MD, Prof., Head of Counselling Center for Cognitive Disfunctions, Prague, CZ
Kaj Blennow
Kaj Blennow, one of the world's leading researchers into Alzheimer's disease

Michal Fresser

Chief Executive Officer

Michal Fresser first joined Axon in 2013 as a board member & general counsel to the firm. In 2019, he was appointed Chief Executive Officer of Axon, and also serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors of Axon’s two subsidiaries – Axon Neuroscience CRM Services SE and Axon Neuroscience R&D Services SE. Prior to his arrival at Axon, Michal had established a career in both legal advisory and consulting. There, he covered multiple sectors, gaining extensive knowledge on mergers and acquisitions, cross-border transactions, and both corporate and competition law.

Norbert Žilka

Chief Science Officer

Norbert has been with Axon since its establishment in 1999. He has played a key role in guiding discoveries and has helped transform Axon’s portfolio of products, which eventually led to his appointment as CSO in 2015. He has co-authored the project Synaptic Dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease (Marie Curie Innovative Training Network). In addition, he serves as the national coordinator and Chairman of the Neuroscience session at the first UK-V4 Frontiers of Science Meeting (in collaboration with Royal Society UK). He was also the main coordinator of the FENS-IBRO Summer School – Neuroproteomics in animal model for neurodegenerative disorders, which took place in Slovakia in 2010. Norbert holds a PhD in Immunology from the Slovak Academy of Sciences (SAS) and is director at the Institute of Neuroimmunology at SAS.

Ladislav Satko

Chief Financial Officer

Ladislav Satko has over fifteen years’ experience leading finance and operations for international businesses. In 2003, Ladislav worked in a financial role for a European construction business. Following this, he was Head of Finance for one of the largest central European publicly traded real estate companies. In November 2011 he was appointed Chief Financial Officer of Axon, where he is responsible for financial, human resources and IT matters. Ladislav holds a Master’s degree in Business Administration from the University of Economics in Bratislava.

Roman Sivák

Managing Director of Axon Neuroscience CRM and R&D

Roman serves as Managing Director of Axon’s two subsidiaries – Axon Neuroscience CRM Services SE and AXON Neuroscience R&D Services SE, having previously been CEO of Axon from 2011 until 2019. He has extensive experience in the financial sector and has served in various management positions for start-up projects and acquisitions. He has also served as a member of supervisory boards of multiple start-up projects and acquisitions in industrial and financial sectors. Roman holds a Master of Economics degree from the University of Economics in Bratislava.

Prof. Michal Novák

Co-Founder of Axon Neuroscience

Professor Novak is a board member for Axon, having co-founded the company in 1999. He is a world-renowned scientist, and prior to founding Axon, spent 10 years at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge in a team with three Nobel Laureates. There, Professor Novak created a monoclonal antibody (MN423), which has driven revolutionary discoveries in understanding the role of tau protein in Alzheimer’s disease. Professor Novak is also the founder of the Institute of Neuroimmunology of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, The Memory Foundation, The Slovak Alzheimer’s Association and the Slovak Society for Neuroscience, while also serving as the co-founder of the EU Joint Programme- Neurodegenerative Disease Research (JPND). In 2016, he was awarded with the World Health Organisation’s prize for Research in Health Care for the Elderly and in Health Promotion.

Bengt Winblad

MD, Prof., Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm, SE

Bengt Winblad currently serves as Professor of Geriatric Medicine at the Karolinska Institute (Sweden) and is Chief Physician at Karolinska University in Huddinge. As a testament to his substantial experience in dementia research, Bengt has received numerous awards for his research including the Royal Swedish Academy of Medical Sciences Award for Dementia Research (1997), the Swedish Society of Medicine Award (2001), and the 2002 Nordic Prize in Gerontology. Beyond this, Bengt has published multiple publications on dementia. He received his PHD in 1975 at the University of Umea, Sweden.

Philip Scheltens

Dr, Prof., Director of VUmc Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam, NL

Philip Scheltens is a Professor of Cognitive Neurology and Director of the Alzheimer Centre at the VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, while also serving as an Honorary Professor of Neurology at University College London. He is one of the world leaders in the development of biomarkers and imaging techniques for Alzheimer’s disease detection and diagnosis. He is the founder of the VUmc Alzheimer Center in the Netherlands, which he has directed since 2000. During this period, Philip produced over 50 PhD theses and founded the Alzheimer Research Centre. Philip was also the Chief Editor of the Official Journal of the Dutch Society of Neurology until 2008 and Associate Editor of the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry until 2010. He is co-editor-in-chief of Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy and acts as an ad hoc reviewer of scientific articles for all of the major journals. Philip studied at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands, gaining his MD in 1984, and PhD (magnetic resonance imaging in Alzheimer’s disease) in 1993.

Howard Feldman

MD, FRCP(C), Director of UC San Diego ADCS, San Diego, USA

Howard Feldman is a clinical neurologist and Professor of Neurosciences at the University of California, San Diego. Since 2016, he has served as a Director of the Alzheimer’s disease Cooperative Study and has been involved in a host of clinical trials which have resulted in scientific discoveries. Howard was appointed as a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and the American Academy of Neurology in 2008. Meanwhile, his achievements have been recognised by Thomson Reuters who have placed him among ‘the world’s most influential scientific minds.’

John Harrison

Assoc Prof., Alzheimer Center, VUmc, Amsterdam, NL/UK

Dr. John Harrison is an Associate Professor at the Alzheimer Centre of the VUmc in Amsterdam. He is experienced in the private sector, having provided consultancy to over 30 companies in the development of new drugs. John regularly speaks on the use of cognitive testing at international meetings, including the American Alzheimer’s Association roundtable and the European Task Force for Alzheimer’s disease. He received his PhD at the University of London in 1993.

Khalid Iqbal

Professor and Chairman, Department of Neurochemistry, Staten Island, New York, USA

Khalid Iqbal is a world-renowned authority in the field of Alzheimer’s research. He works as Professor and Chairman for the Department of Neurochemistry at the New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities. Khalid is renowned in the neurochemistry field for his discovery of the pharmacologic enhancement of the dentate gyrus neurogenesis that improved cognitive performance of adult rats. Khalid has been recognised for his work with the Potamkin Prize for Alzheimer disease research from the American Academy of Neurology, and the Zenith Award from the Alzheimer’s Association, U.S.A. He received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1969 from the University of Edinburgh.

Richard Kay

Expert in Statistics, an Honorary Visiting Professor at the School of Pharmacy, University of Cardiff and a member of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine. Editor of the journal Pharmaceutical Statistics.

Richard Kay is an Honorary Visiting Professor in the School of Pharmacy at Cardiff University since 2010. He is also an Editor of the Journal Pharmaceutical Statistics. Having spent 15 years in academia, he set up RK Statistics in 1989, where he has provided consultancy and training services to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. Richard received a PhD in Medical Statistics in 1972 at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London.

Reinhold Schmidt

Univ.-Prof. Dr.med.univ , Universitätsklinik für Neurologie, Graz, AT

Reinhold Schmidt works as a professor in the University Clinic for Neurology at the Medical University of Graz. He also serves in an editorial capacity in multiple international journals, while authoring many research publications on aging, dementia and primary and secondary prevention of strokes. Reinhold has been recognised for his work in Neurology and Alzheimer’s with a number of awards, most recently being appointed as a Fellow of the European Academy of Neurology and as an Honorary President of the Austrian Alzheimer’s Society.

Lutz Frölich

MD, Prof., Head of Clinics of Gerontopsychiatry, Mannheim, GE

Lutz Frolich is head of the department for Geriatric Psychiatry at the Central Institute of Mental Health (ZI) in Mannheim. He has centred his career around the study of dementia and has produced multiple publications on the subject. He is also a member of the Executive Committee of the European Alzheimer’s Disease Consortium. Lutz received a doctorate from the University of Kentucky in 1982.

Jakub Hort

MD, Prof., Head of Counselling Center for Cognitive Disfunctions, FN Motol, Prague, CZ

Jakub Hort serves as a Professor of Neurology at Charles University. He is also the Head of the Memory Clinic for the Department of Neurology at the International Clinical Research Centre. He has published over 30 papers on the subject of Neurology and serves as the vice-chair of the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) Scientific panel on dementia and cognitive neurology, where he is in charge of EFNS task force on cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Jakub received his PhD in biomedicine in 1998 at the Charles University.

Kaj Blennow

Kaj Blennow is recognised as one of the world's leading researchers into Alzheimer's disease. He is a pioneer in the development of CSF and blood biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

He currently works as the Head of Research on Neurochemical Pathogenesis and Diagnostics at the University of Gothenburg. He has been repeatedly recognised for his work, having been awarded a number of scientific awards. His major research interests include work on neurotransmitter disturbances in aging and brain disorders. His work has harvested him a crop of academic prizes, from The European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Award in 1991, to The Alois Alzheimer Research Award in 2001, the Henry Wisniewski Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011 and the Söderberg Prize in Medicine in 2016. Kaj holds a PhD in medical Science from the University of Gothenburg.



Science

Founded in 1999, Axon now has the single biggest team in the world dedicated exclusively to tau protein research in relation to treating Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies.

Tau proteins play a vital role in the healthy, normal functioning of a brain. They are involved in a variety of physiological processes including cell signaling, the dynamics of the cellular cytoskeleton, and protecting DNA. Alzheimer’s disease is triggered when these normal tau proteins become pathological by truncation. Pathological tau proteins are prone to attaching to each other, and also attracting normal tau proteins, generating pathological tau strains that spread throughout the brain. The distribution of these strains shows strong correlation with cognitive decline and memory impairment in Alzheimer’s disease patients. Over the last two decades, Axon has generated robust and comprehensive data confirming that pathological tau is the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. The company's lead therapeutic candidates specifically identify and target pathological tau to halt the spread of tau pathology, and leave healthy tau untouched. Axon’s therapeutic candidates effectively stop Alzheimer’s disease from progressing, thus preventing the cognitive and functional decline of the patients.

AADvac1

Active Vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease: The active vaccine candidate is the most clinically-advanced tau therapy in development for Alzheimer’s disease. It instructs the patient’s immune system to produce specific antibodies targeting pathological tau.

AADvac2

Humanized Monoclonal Antibody for Alzheimer’s disease: The monoclonal antibody candidate produced in the laboratory conditions that is delivered to the patient’s body in order to target pathological tau.

ACvac1

Pluri-epitope peptide vaccine: it instructs the patient’s immune system to produce specific antibodies targeting only selected short areas on the Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, in order to stop the virus from interacting with host cells and replicating.

ACmab1

The monoclonal antibody candidate ACmab1 targets the specific areas on the Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 that infect the host cells and cause the virus to replicate. The antibody blocks the interaction of the virus Spike protein with ACE2 receptor and thus neutralizes the virus.

p-tau T217 ultrasensitive immunoassay

The leading diagnostic immunoassay is based on the detection of novel Alzheimer´s disease biomarker phosphorylated T217 tau species in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood. The assay can specifically discriminate Alzheimer´s disease patients from patients suffering from other dementias and tau related disorders.

Diagnostic Assay Program

There is an urgent need for novel diagnostic tools that may improve diagnostic precision. Therefore, Axon has embarked upon an extensive research program on novel Alzheimer´s disease biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid and blood. We are using cutting-edge technologies to identify Alzheimer´s disease-specific biomarkers with diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. Our approach centres on miRNA, metabolomics, peptidomics and proteomics.

Axon's Validation Platforms

Axon Neuroscience has generated a variety of animal rodent models recapitulating the main pathological features of Alzheimer's disease such as neurofibrillary pathology, neuroinflammation, synaptic dysfunction, and many others. The models are ideally suited for preclinical drug development studies of tau-based therapies and identification of novel fluid biomarkers.

AADvac1

Axon’s therapeutic candidates AADvac1 and AADvac2 share the same mechanism of action. They differ from other tau-based therapies by tackling both the formation of pathological tau oligomers and the spread of existing tau oligomers throughout the brain. Until now, the pharmaceutical industry has focused primarily on the latter, which puts our approach at advantage. AADvac1 and AADvac2 have both been proven to successfully discriminate between healthy and pathological tau proteins, ensuring that only the latter are targeted, which is an essential safety factor of Axon’s therapy. AADvac1 is capable of tackling Alzheimer’s disease even in its pre-symptomatic stages, which can start 10 to 20 years prior to the onset of the first clinical symptoms. This is a potentially life-changing opportunity for individuals who would otherwise be destined to suffer from the tragic implications of Alzheimer’s disease.

AADvac2

Axon’s therapeutic candidates AADvac1 and AADvac2 share the same mechanism of action. They differ from other tau-based therapies by tackling both the formation of pathological tau oligomers and the spread of existing tau oligomers throughout the brain. Until now, the pharmaceutical industry has focused primarily on the latter, which puts our approach at advantage. AADvac1 and AADvac2 have both been proven to successfully discriminate between healthy and pathological tau proteins, ensuring that only the latter are targeted, which is an essential safety factor of Axon’s therapy. AADvac1 is capable of tackling Alzheimer’s disease even in its pre-symptomatic stages, which can start 10 to 20 years prior to the onset of the first clinical symptoms. This is a potentially life-changing opportunity for individuals who would otherwise be destined to suffer from the tragic implications of Alzheimer’s disease.

ACvac1

Pluri-epitope peptide approach, is a promising alternative to conventional vaccine approaches, particularly given its the selectivity, specificity and safety, which gives Axon a competitive advantage over other vaccines in the development. ACvac1 has potential to stimulate robust immune response even in the most vulnerable elderly population and people with immunodeficiencies.




Scientific Publications

Featured publications under Axon’s authorship

Safety and immunogenicity of the tau vaccine AADvac1 in patients with Alzheimer's disease: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 trial

10.1016/S1474-4422(16)30331-3

FUNDAMANT: an interventional 72-week phase 1 follow-up study of AADvac1, an active immunotherapy against tau protein pathology in Alzheimer’s disease

10.1186/s13195-018-0436-1

A walk through tau therapeutic strategies - Acta Neuropathol Communication

10.1186/s40478-019-0664-z

Evaluation of a novel immunoassay to detect p-tau Thr217 in the CSF to distinguish Alzheimer disease from other dementias

10.1212/WNL.0000000000010814

Humanized tau antibodies promote tau uptake by human microglia without any increase of inflammation

10.1186/s40478-020-00948-z

Therapeutic antibody targeting microtubule-binding domain prevent sneuronal internalization of extracellular tau via masking neuron surface proteoglycans

10.1186/s40478-019-0770-y

Our full set of publications can be found here.




Pipeline

Our product pipeline and the various stages of development

  • Discovery
  • Preclinical
  • Phase 1
  • Phase 2
  • Phase 3
  • Filed
Product Candidate
Indication
Discovery
Preclinical
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Filed

AADvac1

Alzheimer´s disease

Active Vaccine: it instructs the patient’s immune system to produce specific antibodies targeting pathological tau. The Phase II clinical trial, demonstrated that the vaccine is safe and well tolerated, immunogenic and slows down the neurodegeneration and cognitive and functional decline in AD biomarker positive patients.

AADvac1

nfvPPA

Active Vaccine: it instructs the patient’s immune system to produce specific antibodies targeting pathological tau. It was tested on patients suffering from non-fluent variant of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) in collaboration with German FTLD consortium in the open-label Phase 1 clinical trial.

AADvac2

Alzheimer´s disease

Tauopathies
Humanized Monoclonal Antibody for Alzheimer’s Disease and other Tauopathies: The monoclonal antibody candidate produced in laboratories that is itself delivered to the patient’s body to target pathological tau.

Tau antibody program

Alzheimer´s disease

Tauopathies
Axon has extensive experience in generating and producing specific tau antibodies that recognize different p-dependent and independent epitopes. These antibodies are used to generate novel diagnostic assays and therapeutic approaches.

ACvac1

COVID-19

Pluri-epitope peptide vaccine: it instructs the patient’s immune system to produce specific antibodies targeting only selected short areas on the Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, in order to stop the virus from interacting with host cells and replicating.

ACmab1

COVID-19

The humanized monoclonal antibody candidate targets the specific areas on the Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, which infect the host cells and cause the virus to replicate.

P-Tau T217 diagnostic assay

Alzheimer´s disease

AXON developed immunoassay detecting novel p-tau T 217 biomarker. p-tau T217 displayed better diagnostic accuracy than currently used p-tau T181 assay. The data suggest that the new p-tau T217 assay has potential as an AD diagnostic test in clinical evaluation.

Tau oligomerization inhibitors

Alzheimer´s disease

AXON has identified several lead candidates of small molecules with the ability to block tau-tau oligomerisation and protect the brain from the formation of neurofibrillary lessions.



Clinical trials

In the past two decades, Axon has made strong contributions in the tau protein research in Alzheimer’s disease, leading to significant milestones along the way

AADvac1 Phase I Trial in Alzheimer’s disease

The Phase I trial, including the follow-up trial of the vaccine between 2013-2015, proved excellent safety and tolerability, robust immunogenicity and compelling efficacy signals of the vaccine, prompting the Axon team to move forward with its development. The results were published by renowned scientific journals - The Lancet Neurology and Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy.

Safety and immunogenicity of the tau vaccine AADvac1 in patients with Alzheimer's disease: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 trial Authors: Novak P et al. Journal Lancet Neurology, 2016
AADvac1 Phase II trial in Alzheimer’s disease

ADAMANT, the AADvac1 phase II trial, was a 24-month randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group, double-blinded, multicentre study to assess safety and efficacy of the first tau active vaccine AADvac1 in patients with mild Alzheimer´s disease. The Phase II trial confirmed the exceptional safety profile of the vaccine, demonstrated a statistically significant impact on neurodegeneration, and slowed down cognitive and functional decline in the AD biomarker-positive patients, suggesting a disease-modifying effect on Alzheimer’s disease.

Additional information can be found on:
https://www.alzforum.org/therapeutics/aadvac1
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT02579252
AADvac1 Phase I trial in non-fluent variant of Primary progressive aphasia

AIDA is a 24-month randomized, parallel group, single-blinded, multi-centre phase 1 pilot study of AADvac1 in patients with non-fluent primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA). The first objective is to assess the safety of AADvac1 in patients with nfvPPA, and the second objective is immunogenicity – the ability to create antibodies against pathological tau protein. Efficacy on clinical, cognitive and biomarker readouts will be assessed in an exploratory manner. The AIDA Phase I study is being conducted in Germany and enrolled 33 patients.

Additional information can be found on:
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03174886




Press Release

For media enquiries, please contact us
media@axon-neuroscience.eu




Careers

Axon currently employs over 60 scientists with expertise in key disciplines relevant to Axon’s product development – immunology, pharmacology, structural biology, proteomics, and genomics.

We recognize that invenntiveness is at the heart of success
At Axon Neuroscience we consistently collaborate to discover, develop, and deliver breakthrough therapies for patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. We provide our employees with a challenging workplace where each position offers an inspiring opportunity for professional development. A passion for innovation underpins our work.

We encourage thinking outside the box
We offer exciting and inspiring careers within a collaborative and knowledge-driven environment where ideas and skills are highly valued; and where individual contributions are encouraged and rewarded. Employees take advantage of opportunities to attend international conferences, participate in international collaborations, and publish their research in scientific journals.

Employees create a can-do atmosphere
We are always on the lookout for strongly motivated people who are capable, talented and enthusiastic and are looking to work in an environment that values both individual and team contributions. Joining our team provides an opportunity to grow and develop your career.

Contact us

Find out more about AXON Neuroscience job opportunities or send us your resume via webform down below:

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